The UAMS Myeloma Institute, under the leadership of Dr. Gareth Morgan, is the most comprehensive center in the world for research and clinical care related to multiple myeloma and related diseases, such as Castleman Disease and Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia.  Our team of leading scientists and clinicians has pioneered many advances that have become standards of care, leading to improved survival rates. The Myeloma Institute is known for its “bench to bedside” approach, continually translating advances in the laboratory into breakthrough clinical treatments.

We are committed to

  • Accelerating curative therapies for multiple myeloma and related diseases through an integrated program of innovative research and high-quality, comprehensive patient care
  • Customizing care based on each patient’s genetic profile and risk factors for truly personalized treatment
  • Pushing the envelope of understanding and discovery to unravel the biology of multiple myeloma and maximize cure

Latest News

  • International Expert at UAMS Myeloma Institute Releases First Book on Castleman DiseaseJanuary 31, 2018

    Frits van Rhee, M.D., Ph.D., professor of medicine and director of developmental and translational medicine at the Myeloma Institute at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), has changed that.

    Frits van Rhee of UAMS Myeloma Institute has compiled the first book dedicated exclusively to Castleman disease. International Expert at UAMS Myeloma Institute Releases First Book on Castleman Disease Susan Van Dusen Jan. 30, 2018 — Castleman disease, a rare disorder of the lymph nodes and related tissues, was identified and named more than a…

  • Multiple Myeloma: A Rare and Complex CancerNovember 30, 2017

    We continue our series on multiple myeloma with an interview with Gareth J. Morgan, MD, FRCP, FRCPath, PhD, professor of hematology and director of the Myeloma Institute at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). Dr. Morgan also serves as deputy director of the Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute at UAMS.

  • UAMS Study Identifies One Reason Myeloma Patients Respond Differently to TreatmentOctober 10, 2017

    Niels Weinhold, Ph.D., (left) and Leo Rasche, M.D., researchers with the UAMS Myeloma Institute, leading a team in a study of 51 myeloma patients, have discovered patients respond differently to treatment because cancer cells can vary depending on their location. The team’s findings, which underscore the need to explore more than the standard biopsy site of the upper, outer edge of the pelvis, were recently published in an article in Nature Communications.

    Oct. 10, 2017 | Researchers with the Myeloma Institute at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) have identified one reason myeloma patients respond differently to treatment — the cancer cells can vary in type and intensity depending on where in the bone marrow they are located. The team headed by Leo Rasche, M.D., and Niels Weinhold, Ph.D.,…

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